Pinchuk Art Centre (Kyiv, Ukraine) presents an exhibition of the 21 shortlisted artists for the 5th edition of the Future Generation Art Prize. Running from 9 February – 7 April 2019, the exhibition reveals a breadth of contemporary art practices from a judicious selection of artists and artist collectives spanning five continents. Established by the Victor Pinchuk Foundation in 2009, 2019 marks the 10th anniversary of the prize’s founding. Featuring new and recent works, the exhibition explores two recurring themes through a variety of media. The first considers an ‘archeology of the future’, exploring the past and present through the eyes of tomorrow. Using cutting-edge technologies, the works question the possibilities of interpreting knowledge in today’s world. Investigating ideas of the self, the second theme of the exhibition draws from individual socio-cultural values and traditions, whilst also exploring more poetic considerations of the psychological journey. Here, artists similarly reflect on a discrepancy between those traditions and shifting realities in a globalized world. Shortlisted artists are: Monira Al Qadiri, Yu Araki, Korakrit Arunanondchai, Kasper Bosmans, Madison Bycroft, Alia Farid, Gabrielle Goliath, Rodrigo Hernández, Laura Huertas Millán, Marguerite Humeau, Eli Lundgaard, Taus Makhacheva, Toyin Ojih Odutola, Sondra Perry, Gala Porras-Kim, Emilija Škarnulytė, Jakob Steensen, Daniel Turner, Anna Zvyagintseva and artist collectives Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme and Cooking Sections.

Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long is an installation consisting of hand-hammered brass panels depicting fleeting moments of closeness and self awareness. In the difficulty to get hold of them, one could project a case in which they are constantly escaping the need to take a concrete form. A hand attempting to grasp is therefore the image Rodrigo Hernández uses for this installation to grow around. The viewer is invited to infer the work’s reference to monumental reliefs and the enduring quality of the materials and techniques traditionally used to fabricate it. The artist uses metal’s potential to gift images with a longer life with a preference for the personal, the intimate and the momentary, giving shape to a work where the gap between its formal and conceptual considerations is barely recognisable.

Images provided by the PinchukArtCentre © 2019. Photographed by Maksym Bilousov.

 

Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long., 2019; Installation view; Hand-hammered brass; Dimensions variable
Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long., 2019; Installation view; Hand-hammered brass; Dimensions variable
Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long., 2019; Installation view; Hand-hammered brass; Dimensions variable
Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long., 2019; Installation view; Hand-hammered brass; Dimensions variable
Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long., 2019; Installation view; Hand-hammered brass; Dimensions variable
Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long., 2019; Installation view; Hand-hammered brass; Dimensions variable
Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long., 2019; Installation view; Hand-hammered brass; Dimensions variable
Nothing is solid. Nothing can be held in my hand for long., 2019; Installation view; Hand-hammered brass; Dimensions variable