“Leave the furrow when working the land” is the translation in Spanish of the Latin word de-lirare,
which seems like a letter from a poem or from folklore. I was interested in understanding the norm and normality and I discovered a poem when I met the delirious, with whom it rests or leaves the groove. By translating these searches into forms, I came across the egg and the brick and related them formally, symbolically and conceptually. The rough brick, geometric and modular, potentially something: a construction. The egg: beautiful, soft and modular, potentially something: a life. The two became a synthesis of the cultural and the biological. I then distributed these relationships in a numerical field to create a fiction that Darwin explains very well: There are organisms that reproduce and the progeny inherit characteristics of their parents; there are variations of characteristics if the environment does not allow all the members of a population to grow. The members of the population with less adapted characteristics are more likely to die, and those members with better adapted characteristics more likely to survive.

–Gabrie Chlaile

Gabriel Chaile, “Leave the furrow to work the earth (Delusions of Grandeur II)”, 2014; Bricks, iron, eggs, bronze, light bulb; 400 x 700 x 400 cm